Download Agriculture: The Food We Grow and Animals We Raise (Natural by Julie Kerr Casper PDF

By Julie Kerr Casper

Explores essentially the most vital makes use of of the land: the construction of agriculture. This e-book is helping readers study that farms and ranches produce even more than nutrition; yet scientists, farmers, ranchers, and different landowners have not solved conservation difficulties - but.

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Agriculture: The Food We Grow and Animals We Raise (Natural Resources)

Explores probably the most vital makes use of of the land: the creation of agriculture. This e-book is helping readers research that farms and ranches produce even more than meals; yet scientists, farmers, ranchers, and different landowners have not solved conservation difficulties - but.

Extra resources for Agriculture: The Food We Grow and Animals We Raise (Natural Resources)

Example text

Government encouraged farmers to produce more wheat, so farmers on the fragile southern Great Plains plowed up the natural grass cover, which had protected the soil for centuries, to plant winter wheat. The Great Plains extend eastward from the Rocky Mountains across the western parts of North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. Soon, the wheat crops exhausted the topsoil. In addition, overgrazing by cattle and sheep herds stripped the western plains of their protective grass cover.

They can be spread by human activity, birds, animals, wind, and water. Early European settlers in North America unwittingly brought a lot of weed seeds with them. The seeds could have been hidden in the hay they brought over for their animals, in the dirt they used as ballast for their ships, in the fleece and hair of livestock, in their clothes and bedding, or accidentally mixed in with part of the seeds brought over to plant. Some human activities, such as clearing the land to build on or farm, created open places for weeds to grow.

Using soil too much over a long period of time for a single crop can rob it of the specific nutrients needed by that crop. If the nutrients in the soil are used up, then any crop requiring those nutrients will be unable to grow. If the delicate balance is affected, that crop can become nonrenewable. Another form of nonrenewability concerns invasive plants and noxious weeds. If an aggressive plant or weed infests an area, it can crowd out native plants by using vital nutrients in the soil so that renewable and Nonrenewable RESOURCES the native plants cannot survive.

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